Icons of Wall St

January 13, 2019

Preserving New York City’s Landmarks with Art For the 50th anniversary of the New York City landmarks law, which created and empowered the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate worthy individual landmarks, interior landmarks, and historic districts to save them from the wrecking ball. By honoring these historic buildings with pen and ink, we add just a bit more gravity to the great work being done by Mayor Bill de Blasio, NYT’s Ada Louise Huxtable and landmarks chairwoman, Meenakshi Srinivasan.

Limited edition giclée prints and lithographs, we were created using time honored classic techniques

For the 50th anniversary of the New York City landmarks law, which created and empowered the Landmarks Preservation Commission to designate worthy individual landmarks, interior landmarks, and historic districts to save them from the wrecking ball. By honoring these historic buildings with pen and ink, we add just a bit more gravity to the great work being done by Mayor Bill de Blasio, NYT’s Ada Louise Huxtable and landmarks chairwoman, Meenakshi Srinivasan.

Interview Excerpt: Linda Dienst, former VP Marketing, the Downtown Alliance

Farago knew from the start what we wanted to say—and he helped us say it beautifully. They created Rooftops, an annual report designed to encourage people to set their sights even higher, literally, by showcasing the spectacular Wall Street area rooftops that are rarely seen from the narrow streets below. It was a huge success.

There is still work to be done on the rooftops project. The year 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Mayor Robert Wagner signing the New York City Landmarks Law. We think it’s time to celebrate the 300-plus landmarks currently protected around Wall Street, and to help the Historic Districts Council add more to that list.

Our proposal envisions a “pop up” Landmark Museum in the lobby of one of our neighborhood’s classic buildings, complete with illustrations and historical detail of downtown’s most iconic structures. Each display will have a “beacon” that communicates directly with a viewer’s smartphone. 

Woolworth Building, 233 Broadway (1913)  Trinity Church, 75 Broadway (1698)

Through the beacon we’d transmit photos and paintings of each building displayed, as well as a complete history of the people who lived, worked, played, and thrived in each. We could even transmit clips of movies in which each building appeared – the recent film version of The Great Gatsby, for instance, was shot in part at the Woolworth Building and City Hall.

We’ve begun a follow-up series of illustrations that will focus on the magnificent architectural detail that abounds in Wall Street. It will be paired with the launch of our mobile app, Downtown Details, which allows residents and tourists alike to discover the art and architecture above their heads based on their street location. 

Taking advantage of Google’s new Eddystone beacon technology, we can develop a context-sensitive app that reveals the wonders of downtown architecture to residents or visitors who might otherwise miss them. Just as our rooftop project will turn a lower Manhattan lobby into pop-up museum, our app will transform all of Lower Manhattan into an architectural showcase.

So often we complain that smartphones are changing our behaviors; more and more we look down at our screens instead of out onto the city. Done rightly, our next project can help to redirect visitors’ gazes from their screens and onto the extraordinary environment all around them.

Pop Up Exhibit celebrating the great architects of Wall Street

We’ve begun a follow-up series of illustrations that will focus on the magnificent architectural detail that abounds in Wall Street. It will be paired with the launch of our mobile app, Downtown Details, which allows residents and tourists alike to discover the art and architecture above their heads based on their street location. Taking advantage of Google’s new Eddystone beacon technology, we can develop a context-sensitive app that reveals the wonders of downtown architecture to residents or visitors who might otherwise miss them. Just as our rooftop project will turn a lower Manhattan lobby into pop-up museum, our app will transform all of Lower Manhattan into an architectural showcase.

So often we complain that smartphones are changing our behaviors; more and more we look down at our screens instead of out onto the city. Done rightly, our next project can help to redirect visitors’ gazes from their screens and onto the extraordinary environment all around them.

I'm always looking for new projects and collaborations, I mainly work with Adobe After Effects, Photoshop, Cinema 4D and Procreate. If you like what you see please get in touch.

T H A N K   Y O U
E: hello@farago.com
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